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Death Certificate? Incredible anonymous email sent out about gangsta rap and the prison industry

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  • published
    26 Apr 2012
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Incredible anonymous email sent out about gangsta rap and the prison industry


Wax Poetics have posted an anonymous email regarding the prevalence of gangsta rap throughout the ’90s.

In short, the writer of the email – which was sent to several other websites – claims to have witnessed a 1991 meeting that represents “one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society”. There are no names or details listed (in the writer’s words, “I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day”), but the basic story is that the meeting took place among a “small group of music business insiders” in a private Los Angeles residence, all forced to sign a confidentiality agreement. Once inside, the following happened:

“Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn’t the only one.

“Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room.

“You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn’t dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.”

Of course, in the years that followed, gangsta rap would dominate the airwaves with violence, drugs and sex becoming a ubiquitous theme of the genre. Now, there’s obviously a good chance that this is a hoax, or at least an elaborate exaggeration of a focus group meeting, but still – it’s something to think about (hip-hop probably needs its own Being or Nothingness at this point). Credit to FACT’s Laurent Fintoni for the link – you can read the full letter here.

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