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BADEN POWELL
BADEN POWELL A VONTADE
(SOUL JAZZ)

As part of Soul Jazz’s recent glut of Brazilian reissues, comes this 1964 gem by Baden Powell – not the founder of the Scout movement, we hasten to add, but a guitarist and composer who pioneered the “afro-bossa” sound. Smooth as you like but giddily psychedelic with it. Incredible cover art too.

DICKIE LANDRY
FIFTEEN SAXOPHONES
(UNSEEN WORLDS)

Connoisseurs of the 70s/80s New York avant-garde ought to be all over Fifteen Saxophones, a reissue of a record originally released on Northern Lights and Wergo in 1977. The wonderfully named Dickie Landry co-ran the Chatham Square label with Philip Glass (as well as performing as part of the Philip Glass Ensemble), and his own music bridges the worlds of jazz and art-world experimentalism. Created using elaborate chains of Revox tape delay, on Fifteen Saxophones Landry conjures a forbidding, echo-laden sound-world that still sounds radical today.

JOHN CARPENTER & ALAN HOWARTH
HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH
(DEATH WALTZ)

Death Waltz’s unstoppable flow of classic horror soundtrack reissues brings us one of John Carpenter and Alan Howarth’s finest collaborations, their score for Halloween III: Season Of The Witch, the only instalment in the franchise not to revolve around Michael Myers. Sonically, it’s everything you want: pulsating electronic cues that patiently build up suspense before delivering ghastly, abrupt shocks to your nervous system.

LOUISA ‘MARKSWOMAN’ MARK
BREAKOUT
(SOUL JAZZ)

Heavy lovers rock record from ’81, reissued by Soul Jazz. Mark’s lovelorn yet laconic vocals are undoubtedly the star of the show, but a supporting cast numbering the likes of Dennis Bovell and The Heptones ain’t to be sniffed at.

MERZBOW
LOWEST MUSIC & ARTS 1980-1983
(VINYL-ON-DEMAND)

If you’ve got a spare £150, well, firstly we envy you, deeply, but we’d also recommend you use it to buy this latest breezeblock box set from Vinyl-On-Demand, anthologising various early works by Japanese noise maven Merzbow across (gulp) 10 LPs. None of this music has appeared on vinyl before, and its range is extraordinary, spanning harsh noise and some surprisingly accessible minimal synth experiments.

PALAIS SCHAUMBURG
PALAIS SCHAUMBURG
BUREAU B

Bureau B’s hyperactive reissue project has now moved beyond krautrock and kosmische and on into the NDW (Neue Deutsche Welle) of the 1980s. The ever-shape-shifting Palais Schaumburg counted such iconic artists Holger Hiller, Thomas Fehlmann and Moritz Von Oswald in its ranks at various times, and the group’s debut album, released in 1981, remains their signature work, all impish electro-pop, stilted jazz-funk and acerbic synth experiments.


POPULATION ONE
‘MIDNIGHT HOURS’ / ‘TWO SIDES TO EVERY STORY
(DELSIN)

Perennially underrated Detroit techno producer Terrence Dixon seems to be finally getting his dues off the back of new album From The Far Future Pt.2, and so it’s the perfect time for Delsin to resurrect one of his classic releases from way back in ’96, produced under the name Population One. This is galloping machine-funk and its finest and most fiendishly intricate.

SCIENTIST
IN THE KINGDOM OF DUB
(IMPORTANT RECORDS)

Welcome edition of a 1980 album by Hopeton ‘Scientist’ Brown. Aided and abetted by Jamaica’s finest rhythm section – Sly & Robbie – Tubby’s former studio assistant crafts a long-form dub masterpiece, poised perfectly between the rootical and the utterly spaced out.

VARIOUS ARTISTS
ONLY 4 U: THE SOUND OF CAJMERE & CAJUAL RECORDS 1992-1997
(STRUT)

Essential gatefold edition bringing together the best of Curtis A. Jones’ Cajual label. Includes a bunch of Cajmere tracks (including, of course, ‘The Percolator’) as well as cuts from Braxton Holmes, Andrew Harris, Glenn Underground and more. House music of uncommon swagger and sauciness.

WOO
IT’S COZY INSIDE
(DRAG CITY)

A wonderful surprise from Drag City, It’s Cozy Inside was recorded in the late 80s by brothers Clive and Mark Ives, and originally released on Savage Republic’s Independent Project label in ’89. If you’ve ever fantasised what the Incredible String Band might’ve sounded like if they’d had access to analogue synthesisers, then fantasise no longer; Woo’s bucolic electronic miniatures pull off this anachronistic trick before your very ears, summoning classic ’80s DIY sides by the likes of Flaming Tunes and Storm Bugs along the way.

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