Artist and event database Viberate wants to become “a kind of IMDb for music”

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Want to know the best rock band in Germany, Kazakhstan or even Nigeria? New service Viberate reckon they know.

A new online database from a Slovenian startup, co-founded by techno DJ UMEK with the aim of providing a “smarter way to explore live music”, has just undergone its first major update. The service, called Viberate, has been live for a couple of months, but already has more than 120,000 artists, 210,000 events and 50,000 venues listed, as the site pursues its aim of being “like a kind of IMDb for music.”

Viberate aims to offer a thorough insight into every musician’s career. Their profiles feature daily-updated social media stats from all major social media and streaming sites, as well as information about upcoming show dates and even management contacts. With the intention of “mapping and listing the whole live music ecosystem”, they launched the musician profiles function of the site earlier in 2017, and have now added venue and event pages.

Soon the service will introduce profiles for booking agencies and event organizers, according to Viberate. The database is open for public, so anyone can add new profiles and artists can claim existing ones: Linkin Park and Dutch drum’n’bass artist Noisia are among the artists to have already taken direct control of their profiles, according to company founders.

Viberate’s co-founder UMEK says: “We started as a simple DJ ranking service, because we wanted to know where I rank in terms of online popularity, compared to other DJs. The site took off and after a year we had 30,000 user-generated profiles in the database. We raised some money, employed a really smart team of developers and project managers and we took it to another level. Now we won’t stop until we create a standard, so soon you won’t get anywhere as an artist without having a profile on Viberate. It will become the musical ID for musicians, venues, agents and everyone else working in the live music industry.

“Soon you’ll be able to book an artist on Viberate just like you book accommodation on Airbnb. But there’s a twist – we’ll allow artists to charge their fees in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ether and finally our own crypto coin for the music industry – the Vibe,” says UMEK explaining the company’s mid-term plans. “For all of you who are following the trends and the development of the blockchain technology, now’s your chance to have a stake in it. We will offer our Vibe in a public sale on the 5th of September.”

The crowdsale will take place at Viberate.io, with the company hoping to sell $12m worth of tokens. All proceeds are expected to go towards implementing planned features and orchestrating a global marketing campaign for the service.