“We will not allow such a service to willfully trample the rights of music creators.”

Aurous, the dubious music streaming service dubbed “Popcorn Time for music,” has been sued by the US music industry just hours after launching.

As The Verge reports, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed a lawsuit on behalf of the labels it represents, alleging that the creator of Aurous is fully aware he’s infringing copyright.

While creator Andrew Sampson argues that the BitTorrent engine Aurous is built on is entirely legal, using public APIs from services including YouTube, SoundCloud and Spotify, the RIAA alleges that some of the the content is sourced from illegal filesharing sites like Pleer and MP3Skull.

“This service is a flagrant example of a business model powered by copyright theft on a massive scale,” an RIAA spokesperson told The Guardian. “Like Grokster, Limewire or Grooveshark, it is neither licensed nor legal. We will not allow such a service to willfully trample the rights of music creators.”

Sampson has argued on Twitter that Aurous isn’t profiting in any way, but  the suit does argue that the platform’s “growing base of users” could be monetised now or in the future. Sampson however, plans to “fight the RIAA and win.”

Aurous was first introduced in September, but Sampson swiftly cancelled a crowdfunding campaign to fund the service after it attracted “unwanted attention.”

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